Key Stage 1 to 2 progress measures

Primary Accountability Measures

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The Government has introduced new progress measures, which are a type of value added score, to enable pupils’ results to be compared to actual achievements of other pupils nationally, who had similar prior attainment. (In this context, that prior attainment refers to their Key Stage 1 results.)

So this new accountability relates to the progress from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 2.  The following steps build up the process:

  1. Calculate a pupil’s average performance at Key Stage 1 across reading, writing and maths

  2. Identify the pupil’s Key Stage 2 achievements, reading and maths it is the scaled scores.  Writing gets allocated points based on the outcome of the teacher assessment.

  3. Find the national average Key Stage 2 attainment (one for reading, writing and maths) for children with the same average performance at Key Stage 1 (step 1) in the DfE look up tables.

  4. Calculate the pupil’s progress in each subject from the difference between their pupil’s Key Stage 2 achievements (step 2) and the average result of those in their prior attainment (step 3).

As an example: Simon received 102 in reading at Key Stage 2 and the average Key Stage 2 reading score for his prior attainment group was 101 – his progress score would be +1.

  1. To create a school level progress score. We do this by adding together the progress scores of all the pupils in year 6 and dividing by the number of pupils in the school.

  2. Repeat for each subject

To interpret these, progress scores will be centred or normalised at 0, with most schools within the range of -5 to +5.

  • A score of 0 means pupils in this school on average do about as well at Key Stage 2 as those with similar prior attainment nationally. 

  • A positive score means pupils in this school on average do better at Key Stage 2 as those with similar prior attainment nationally.

  • A negative score means pupils in this school on average do worse at Key Stage 2 as those with similar prior attainment nationally.

 A negative score does not mean that pupils did not make any progress, rather it means they made less progress than other pupils nationally with similar starting points.  

For example, if a school has a maths score of -4 this would mean that on average pupils in this school achieved 4 scaled scores less than other pupils nationally with similar starting points.  

Primary floor standards in 2016

To be above the Government’s nationally set floor standard for 2015/16, a school must meet either the attainment element or the progress element in all three subjects. The standards are:

  • At least 65% of pupils meet the expected standard in reading, writing and maths

  • A progress score of at least -5 in reading, -7 in writing and -5 in maths

 

Progress measures at West Wimbledon Primary School

The attainment progress scores for West Wimbledon Primary School at Key Stage 2 in 2016 are as follows:

  • percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics 55%

  • average progress in reading 3.9

  • average progress in writing -3.9

  • average progress in mathematics 4.2

  • percentage of pupils achieving a high level of attainment in reading, writing and mathematics 3%

  • average scaled score in reading 105.4

  • average scaled score in mathematics.107.2

As can be seen from the data, above, the School did meet and, indeed, exceed the progress score floor standards.