Surveys

The School regularly runs surveys to gather the views of parents, staff and the children, in order to help make improvements and gauge support for new initiatives and ideas. This academic year, we intend to run regular, short single-feature surveys, in addition to the comprehensive annual surveys we run each Spring term. The purpose of these new shorter surveys is to capture a flavour of particular views to help us inform our practice, gauge views on a specific issue or signpost additional areas of focus.

A summary of the most recent, Spring 2017 Parent Survey, may be viewed here.

Impact

Following the appalling tragedies in Westminster, Manchester, London Bridge and then Finsbury Park during the Summer term of 2017, we used a short survey to assess parents’ views about school trips, notably into Central London. The results of that survey, informed the School’s decisions about our trips policy and sharpened our procedures. Those results may be viewed here.

Recent surveys

In advance of the annual, more detailed survey that the School undertakes each Spring, we decided that it would be useful to get a sense of areas on which we should focus at the start of this academic year.

The questions we decided to use were derived from those Ofsted use in their surveys to gather views of schools they are about to visit. Using that national data-set, would then provide us with a basis to compare your responses with those derived from the large number of surveys they run across each year, and which they publish three times a year. Last year, Ofsted received and analysed over 325,000 separate responses, so we knew that it would be fascinating and illuminating to see where our responses might “sit” alongside that national picture.

Our survey, which closed on Wednesday, 27 September 2017, and its subsequent analysis may be accessed here .

We were delighted that 98% of the 58 responses agreed with each of the statements, “My child is happy at School”,  “My child is well taught at School” and “My child is well looked after at School.” Similarly, the responses also showed a better than either national, London or primary score for the statement, “This School makes sure its pupils are well-behaved”.

However, there were some areas for further reflection and, as a result, we have decided to investigate the following areas in some more detail:

  • A significant proportion of responses disagreed with the statement about the School’s provision of appropriate homework, and this is an area that Mrs Ali is going to lead on: and will ask for some parent volunteers to come in to meet with her to try to explore what is currently missing and what we might do better.

  • Similarly, a number of respondents felt that the School does not always provide parents with the information they need about their child’s progress, and Mrs Williamson will lead on investigating what we might do to remedy this.

  • Finally, a number of free-text comments queried the types and effectiveness of communication with parents and Mr Harris will ask for a group of volunteers to meet him so that, together, we can find out how best to improve what we tell you and how we do that.

Thank you again for taking the time to respond and be assured that we will use that data to continue to improve what we do, how do it and how we then communicate with you.